Enter your keyword

Blog

India State of Forest Report 2017

India State of Forest Report 2017

India State of Forest Report 2017 The Environment Ministry’s ‘India State of Forest Report 2017’ based on satellite imagery, may present a net positive balance in the form of 24.4% of India’s land area under some form of forest or tree cover, but this is but a broad-brush assessment. According to the report, forest and tree cover […]

Great Barrier Reef – Edu video

Also 10,000 jobs at stake with about 1,500 km, or two-thirds, of this coral system having been damaged already. Severe coral bleaching on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef may result in a loss of some $750 million for the economy and tourism industry in the state of Queensland. A report released by Australian Climate Council, ‘Climate […]

Solar & Hydro Projects -India

Solar & Hydro Projects -India

The Cabinet has approved the doubling of solar park capacity to 40,000 MW, which will entail an additional 50 solar parks to be set up at a cost to the government of ₹8,100 crore, Minister of New and Renewable Energy Piyush Goyal said on Wednesday.Mr. Goyal added that while most of the additional 50 solar […]

Sutlej-Yamuna Link(SYL) & Punjab

Sutlej-Yamuna Link(SYL) & Punjab

There was never any doubt that Punjab’s legislative adventurism in enacting a law in 2004 to terminate all previous agreements on sharing the waters of the Ravi and the Beas with its neighbours would not survive judicial scrutiny. Answering a Presidential reference on the validity of Punjab’s action, the Supreme Court has declared the State’s […]

Himansh- High altitude Glacial Lab

Himansh- High altitude Glacial Lab

The facility will serve as the base for Terrestrial Laser Scanners and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to digitise glacier movements and snow cover variations. Perched on the Himalayas at an altitude of nearly 13,500 feet, Himansh, the Glaciological research facility of India began functioning on Sunday. Located in Spiti Valley, one of the most uninhabited parts […]

PARIS AGREEMENT-Climate Change

The ratification of the Paris Agreement on climate change by the United States and China, which together account for 38 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, provides much-needed momentum for the global compact to be in force beyond 2020. As UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has emphasised, 26 countries have already acceded to the accord; to reach the target of 55 per cent emissions, 29 more must come on board.

For the U.S., this is a landmark departure from its long-held position of not accepting a binding treaty like the Kyoto Protocol, where emerging economies heavily reliant on fossil fuels have no firm commitments. The Paris Agreement addressed this issue by stipulating voluntary but verifiable emissions reduction goals for all parties, within the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities that underpin the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Contrary to the belief that a requirement to cut GHGs will make economies less competitive, a major section of global industry and business has reaffirmed the potential for trillions of dollars in green investments flowing from the ratification of the Paris Agreement by the U.S. and China. This is a clear pointer for India, which is estimated to have the third highest individual country emissions as of 2014.

India joined other G20 countries at Hangzhou to commit itself to addressing climate change through domestic policy measures. For that to happen, the Centre must initiate a serious discussion with the States on the national imperatives.

The Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) of China and the United States would deliver 51 per cent of the avoided cumulative GHG emissions from 2016-2100 from all of the INDCs in the Paris Agreement. Of this, the U.S. would deliver 19 per cent, and China, 31 per cent of the avoided cumulative GHG emissions from 2016-2100. If both countries kept their pledges, 1050 giga tons (billion tons) of GHG would be kept out of the atmosphere, as per data provided by Climate Interactive and MIT Sloan.

Their calculations also show that deeper, earlier emissions cuts are needed to limit warming to well below 2°C or all the way to the Paris Agreement goal of 1.5°C. In one possible scenario to limit warming to 1.5°C, it would be necessary for the United States to decrease its emissions approximately 10 per cent per year, more aggressively than it pledged in its INDC, starting 2020. And China would need to peak its emissions by 2025, not 2030, and begin reducing emissions approximately 3.5 per cent per year thereafter. IAS MAINS 2016 Questions on Environment