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DAILY CURRENT AFFAIRS ANALYSIS

18th January 2022

No.Topic NamePrelims/Mains
1.    ABOUT THE CENTRAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIONPrelims & Mains
2.    ABOUT THE NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR PROTECTION OF CHILD RIGHTSPrelims & Mains
3.    DETAILS OF THE NATIONAL STATISTICAL OFFICEPrelims & Mains
4.    WHO ARE KONYAK NAGASPrelims Specific
5.    WHAT ARE PR BONDSPrelims Specific

 

1 – ABOUT THE CENTRAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION:

GS II

Topic – Statutory and Non-Statutory Bodies

  • What exactly is CBI:
  • The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) is India’s top investigative agency.
  • It was formed under the Delhi Special Police Establishment Act, 1967.
  • It is overseen by the Department of Personnel, Ministry of Personnel, Pensions & Public Grievances, Government of India, which is part of the prime minister’s office.
  • The Central Vigilance Commission, on the other hand, is in charge of investigations under the Prevention of Corruption Act.
  • It also serves as India’s nodal police agency, coordinating investigations on behalf of Interpol member countries.
  • It has a conviction record of 65 to 70%, which puts it on par with the greatest investigation organizations in the world.
  • The CBI is in charge of a number of cases including:
  • Anti-Corruption Crimes – for the investigation of cases brought against public officials and workers of the Central Government, Public Sector Undertakings, Corporations, or Bodies owned or controlled by the Government of India under the Prevention of Corruption Act.
  • Economic Crimes – for the investigation of major financial scams and serious economic frauds, such as crimes involving Fake Indian Currency Notes, Bank Frauds, and Cyber Crime, bank frauds, Import Export & Foreign Exchange violations, large-scale narcotics, antiques, cultural property, and other contraband items, and so on.
  • Special Crimes – cases of terrorism, bomb blasts, kidnapping for ransom, and crimes perpetrated by the mafia/underworld are investigated under the Indian Penal Code and other laws at the request of state governments or on the directives of the Supreme Court and High Courts.
  • Suo Moto Cases – The CBI can only investigate offences in the Union Territories on its own initiative.
  • The CBI can be authorized by the Central Government to investigate a crime in a state, but only with the approval of the state government in question.
  • The Supreme Court and High Courts, on the other hand, have the authority to direct the CBI to investigate a crime anywhere in the country without the permission of the government.
  • Source – The Hindu

2 – ABOUT THE NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR PROTECTION OF CHILD RIGHTS:

GS II

Topic – Statutory and Non-Statutory Bodies

  • About the NCPCR:
  • The Commission for the Protection of Child Rights Act of 2005 was established in March 2007.
  • It operates under the Ministry of Women and Child Development’s administrative supervision.
  • A child is described as a person who is between the ages of 0 and 18.
  • The mandate of the Commission is to ensure that all laws, policies, programs, and administrative mechanisms are consistent with the Child Rights perspective as embodied in the Indian Constitution and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • The NCPCR has the following authority under the RTE Act of 2009 to:
  • Inquire into any reports of legal violations.
  • Subpoena a person and demand proof.
  • Obtain a magisterial investigation.
  • In the High Court or Supreme Court, file a writ petition.
  • contact the relevant government to request that the perpetrator be prosecuted.
  • Recommend that individuals who have been affected receive interim relief.
  • Composition of NCLAT:
  • There is a chairperson and six members on this panel, at least two of whom should be women.
  • They are all nominated by the central government for a three-year term.
  • The Chairman can serve in the commission until he is 65 years old, and members can serve until they are 60 years old.
  • Committees for the Protection of Children:
  • Child Welfare Committees (CWCs) are to be formed by the State Government for each district, according to Section 27(1) of the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015 (JJ Act), to exercise the powers and discharge the duties conferred on such Committees in relation to children in need of care and protection under the JJ Act, 2015.
  • The committees’ composition is as follows:
  • The Committee will be composed of a Chairperson and four additional members appointed by the State Government, one of whom must be a woman and another must be an expert on children’s issues.
  • Conditions for eligibility:
  • The Chairperson and members must be at least 35 years old and have at least seven years of experience working with children in the fields of education, health, or welfare activities, or they must be a practicing professional with a degree in child psychology, psychiatry, social work, sociology, or human development, or a retired judicial officer.
  • Source – The Hindu

3 – DETAILS OF THE NATIONAL STATISTICAL OFFICE:

GS II

Topic – Statutory and Non-Statutory Bodies

  • About:
  • The government has merged the National Sample Survey Office (NSSO), the Computer Centre, and the Central Statistical Office to form the National Sample Survey Office (NSO) (CSO).
  • The Rangarajan Commission envisioned the NSO to implement and maintain statistical standards and coordinate statistical activities of federal and state entities in accordance with the National Statistical Commission’s guidelines (NSC).
  • Secretary would be in charge of the NSO (Statistics and Programme Implementation).
  • The CSO is in charge of coordinating statistical activities in the country as well as developing statistical standards.
  • The NSSO is in charge of conducting large-scale sample surveys across India in a variety of sectors.
  • It is the statistical wing of the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation’s parent ministry (MoSPI).
  • The following responsibilities have been assigned to the NSO:
  • Acts as the country’s nodal agency for the planned growth of the statistical system.
  • Establishes and maintains norms and standards in the field of statistics, including concepts and terminology, data gathering methodology, data processing, and data dissemination.
  • Prepares and publishes annual estimates of national product, government and private consumer spending, capital formation, savings, capital stock estimates, and fixed capital consumption.
  • Maintains contacts with international statistical organizations such as the UN Statistical Division (UNSD), the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the Statistical Institute for Asia and the Pacific (SIAP), and others.
  • Every month, the Index of Industrial Production (IIP) is compiled and released in the form of ‘rapid estimates,’ and the Annual Survey of Industries is conducted (ASI)
  • Periodic all-India economic censuses and follow-up enterprise surveys are organized and conducted.
  • Source – The Hindu

4 – WHO ARE KONYAK NAGAS:

Prelims Specific Topic

  • Tribe of Konyak Nagas:
  • With a population of around 3 lakh, the Konyaks’ territory extends into Arunachal Pradesh, with a sizable presence in Myanmar.
  • They are reputed to be one of Nagaland’s most ferocious warrior tribes.
  • As late as the 1980s, the Konyaks were the last to abandon the practise of head-hunting, which involved severing the heads of foes after attacking other tribes.
  • Importance of this tribe in the Naga Peace Process:
  • Mon is the only district in Nagaland where the separatist group has been unable to establish a base camp, owing to Konyak resistance.
  • As a result, the Konyaks are critical to the successful conclusion of the peace talks as well as the state’s post-talk peace process.
  • Source – The Hindu

5 – WHAT ARE PR BONDS:

Prelims Specific Topic:

  • The term “no cost bail” refers to a Personal Recognizance (PR) bond, which is also known as an Own Recognizance (OR) bond.
  • With this type of bond, a person is freed from custody without having to post bail.
  • They must, however, appear in court as scheduled and sign a release form expressing this assurance in writing.
  • The individual is then released from custody on the condition that they appear in court and follow any court-imposed conditions of release.
  • Source – The Hindu

 

 

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