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DAILY CURRENT AFFAIRS ANALYSIS

26th January 2022

 No. Topic Name Prelims/Mains
1.    DETAILS OF THE CENTRAL VISTA PROJECT Prelims & Mains
2.    ABOUT THE GST COUNCIL Prelims & Mains
3.    ALL ABOUT JUDICIAL & POLICE CUSTODY Prelims & Mains
4.    HOW HYDROGEN SULPHIDE GAS CAN BE USED TO CURE HIV DISEASE Prelims Specific
5.    DETAILS OF THE S 400 MISSILE SYSTEM Prelims Specific

 

1 – DETAILS OF THE CENTRAL VISTA PROJECT

GS II

Topic – Parliament and related issues

  • Why is it making headlines:
  • The Central Vista Project was recently designated by the Central Government as a National Importance Project.
  • The Central Vista Project is comprised of the following components:
  • The Union Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs submitted a Central Vista refurbishment proposal in 2019.
  • A triangular edifice will be constructed next to the existing Parliament building to serve as the Central Secretariat for the Common Good.
  • Between Rashtrapati Bhavan and India Gate, the 3-kilometer-long Rajpath is being remodelled.
  • Museums will be built in the North and South Blocks.
  • The following is the government’s case for redeveloping Central Vista:
  • The Parliament building’s amenities and infrastructure are insufficient to meet current demand.
  • The offices of the Central Government are distributed around the country, producing inter-departmental coordination challenges and unnecessary travel, which contributes to traffic congestion and pollution.
  • The vast bulk of existing structures have outlived their usefulness.
  • Rashtrapati Bhawan, Parliament House, North and South Blocks, India Gate, and the National Archives are all located in New Delhi’s Central Vista, which is located in the heart of the city.
  • The Central Vista Project’s History:
  • King George V stated in the Delhi Durbar (great assembly) in December 1911 that India’s capital will be moved from Calcutta to Delhi.
  • The Delhi Durbar was conducted to mark the coronation of King George V.
  • A new metropolis was to be designed by Edwin Lutyens, a British architect known for his strong commitment to European Classicism, and Herbert Baker, a well-known South African architect.
  • Herbert Baker also designed the Union buildings in Pretoria, South Africa.
  • The design of Parliament House was a collaboration between Lutyens and Baker.
  • Rashtrapati Bhavan was designed by Edwin Lutyens.
  • The north and south blocks of the Secretariat were designed by Herbert Baker.
  • Source – The Hindu

2 – ABOUT THE GST COUNCIL:

GS III

Topic – Indian Economy

  • The GST Council’s mission statement is as follows:
  • It is established as a constitutional body by Article 279A.
  • The Constitution (One Hundred and First Amendment) Act of 2016 formed it, and it makes recommendations to the Union and State Governments on issues connected to the Goods and Service Tax.
  • The Union Finance Minister chairs the GST Council, which also includes Union State Ministers of Revenue and Finance, as well as State Ministers in Charge of Finance and Taxation.
  • It is a federal body with equal representation for the federal government and the states.
  • The GST Council has the following responsibilities:
  • Every decision of the Goods and Services Tax Council must be taken by a majority of at least three-quarters of the members present and voting, in accordance with the following principles:
  • The vote of the Central Government will be weighted at one-third of all votes cast.
  • And the votes of all the state governments combined will account for two-thirds of the total votes cast.
  • In the Economic Survey 2017-18, the GST Council was praised for its cooperative federalism approach, which brings the Centre and States together and may be implemented to a number of policy initiatives.
  • Source – The Hindu

3 – ALL ABOUT JUDICIAL & POLICE CUSTODY:

GS II

Topic – Judiciary & Criminal Laws

  • The Basic Idea:
  • The act of apprehending someone for the purpose of providing protective care is referred to as “custody.”
  • The terms “arrest” and “custody” do not mean the same thing. While every arrest does result in jail, the contrary is not true.
  • When someone is arrested, their personal liberty is instantly jeopardised. It violates his right to liberty.
  • Custody in police custody (Police Custody):
  • When police receive information, a complaint, or a report about a crime, a police officer arrests the suspect involved in the incident and brings him to a police station to prevent him from committing more offences. This is referred to as “Police Custody.”
  • It is the incarceration of a suspect in the custody of the police in a police station’s jail. During this confinement, which should not last longer than 24 hours, the investigating officer may question the subject.
  • The investigating officer must bring the defendant to the appropriate judge within 24 hours, excluding travel time from the police station to the court.
  • The judiciary’s custody (Judicial Custody):
  • The accused is in the custody of the concerned Magistrate in judicial custody, whereas the accused is in the custody of the police in police custody.
  • The accused is held in a police station lockup in the first case, but in the second case, the accused is imprisoned in a jail.
  • The Cr.P.C. kicks in when a person is taken into custody by the police, and he or she must be presented before a Magistrate within 24 hours of the arrest.
  • What Happens After Judicial Custody:
  • Police can detain a person or place them in judicial custody.
  • When a suspect is arrested, the first thing that happens to him is that he is placed in police custody. He is then taken before a magistrate and may be held in judicial custody or restored to police custody.
  • What is the difference between police custody and judicial custody according to the CrPC:
  • When a person suspected of committing a cognizable offence is seized and detained by the police, and then produced within 24 hours (excluding travel time from the arrest place), or when he surrenders himself to the nearest Magistrate.
  • The Magistrate can then decide whether he should be released on bail or held in court or police custody.
  • If the accused is a juvenile, his age must be determined, and he must appear before the Juvenile Justice Board if he is found to be a juvenile.
  • Suspects in custody of the police or the courts are presumed to be suspects.
  • A suspect does not become a criminal until a court finds him or her guilty and sentences him or her to prison for the crime reported.
  • Deterrents are provided by these types of custodies.
  • When a police officer has custody of a suspect, he or she has the ability to treat him or her whatever he or she deems fit.
  • When a suspect is arrested by the police while the investigation is still underway, the suspect’s lawyer frequently asks for Bail or Judicial Custody.
  • When a suspect is placed in judicial custody, he or she becomes the responsibility of the court.
  • The investigating officer is not allowed to question the suspect while he or she is in judicial custody.
  • However, if the court deems the interrogations are essential based on the evidence submitted to it, the court may approve them.
  • Source – The Hindu

4 – HOW HYDROGEN SULPHIDE GAS CAN BE USED TO CURE HIV DISEASE:

Prelims Specific Topic

  • The Indian Institute of Science (IISc.) and its partners have discovered that hydrogen sulphide (H2S) gas plays a critical function in inhibiting the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).
  • H2S levels were discovered to have a direct effect on the virus’s ability to multiply in HIV-infected human immune cells. The discovery lays the possibility for the development of a more comprehensive HIV antiviral therapy.
  • Researchers from IISc’s Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology (MCB) and the Centre for Infectious Disease Research (CIDR), as well as collaborators from the Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, were part of the team. The findings were published in the eLife journal.
  • Current state-of-the-art combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is not a cure for HIV, according to an IISc. statement. It can only make the virus dormant in order to suppress it.
  • Source – The Hindu

5 – DETAILS OF THE S 400 MISSILE SYSTEM:

Prelims Specific Topic:

  • The S-400 Triumf Missile System has the following features:
  • The S-400 Triumf is a Russian mobile surface-to-air missile system (SAM). It is the world’s most hazardous operationally deployed modern long-range SAM (MLR SAM), with the US-developed Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system trailing far behind (THAAD).
  • Within a range of 400 kilometres and at altitudes of up to 30 kilometres, the system can engage all forms of aerial targets, including aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and ballistic and cruise missiles.
  • The device can track 100 targets in the air and engage six of them at once.
  • Importance for India:
  • China is also buying the system, according to India. China and Russia reached an agreement in 2015 to buy six battalions of the system. It was first delivered in January of this year.
  • The S-400 system’s acquisition by China has been dubbed a “game changer” in the region. Its usefulness against India, however, is limited.
  • In a two-front battle, India’s purchase is critical in countering strikes, including even high-end F-35 US fighter planes.
  • Source – The Hindu

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